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Mastering
Belly Dance
Rhythms DVD

Mastering Belly Dance Rhythms

Near- and Mid-East Rhythms
Used in Belly Dance,
page 5

RHYTHM

TIME
SIG

TYPICAL
BPM

SOURCE

USE

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SOUND CLIP

GROUP IX

SPECIALTY RHYTHMS

Zaar
(may be spelled as Zar)

2/4

40-70

Identical to the Ayoub, the Zaar originates in the sub-Saharan Near East (southern Egypt, Sudan, Ethiopia, Somalia) as a ritual or trance dance for pagan healing ceremonies; it is played more slowly than Ayoub, to resemble a heartbeat

often performed for stage including floor work or ritualistic performances; props, such as swords, candles, or bowls often accompany the Zaar performance

Zaar_basic40

Zaar_basic60

Zaar_complex40

Zaar_complex60

Zaar_Darieh_
complex40

Zaar_Darieh_
complex60

Malfouf
(also variously spelled Malfuf or Malfoof)

2/4

100-120

Exact origins are unknown; it appears all over the Middle East, Greece, Spain, Latin America, and the United States; it is ubiquitous—found on almost any belly dance CD

The Malfouf serves predominantly as an entrance and is especially suitable for two-drum performances

Malfouf_basic80

Malfouf_basic120

Malfouf_complex80

Malfouf_
complex120


Rasba

4/4

~120 bpm

The Rasba is considered an Egyptian rhythm; it can be found on many Egyptian belly dance and classical Mid-East music CDs

It is almost exclusively used as a preamble or an opening/entrance rhythm for a complete Egyptian belly dance suite

Rasba_basic120

Rasba_complex120

Rasba_Darieh_
complex120

GROUP X

VARIATIONS ON A THEME

Wahda-Nous
(Wahda Nous may also be spelled Wahad e Noss. Alternate—and incorrect—spellings include “Wahida” (without the “Nous”), and Wada (without the H aspiration sound), and “Wahda Noof,” in which the “s” is pronounced as an “f”)

4/4

~100 bpm

Wahda-Nous’ exact origins are unknown, but its use is widespread throughout the Middle East; it is ubiquitous—found on almost any belly dance CD

It serves well as a middle-section piece in a 5- to 7-part belly dance suite transitioning from a Chiftetelli (which it resembles rhythmically—see below), or if played faster, as part of a drum solo

Wahda-Nous_
basic40

Wahda-Nous_
basic60

Wahda-Nous_
basic100

Wahda-Nous_
complex40

Wahda-Nous_
complex60

Wahda-Nous_
complex100


Chiftetelli
(also spelled Chiftatelli or Shiftatelli)

8/4

40-60 bpm

The Chiftetelli is the same rhythm as the Wahda-Nous, played slower over two musical measures. Though the name Chiftetelli is of Turkish origin, the name is used throughout the Middle East; the rhythm is ubiquitous—found on almost any belly dance CD from Arabic to Turkish to Greek

The Chifetelli is used for very slow veil work, slow, sinuous movements, and floor work

Chiftetelli_basic40

Chiftetelli_basic60

Chiftetelli_
complex40

Chiftetelli_
complex60

Chiftetelli_
2x-complex40

Chiftetelli_
2x-complex60

More rhythms continued here!   Page 6…

More rhythms continued here!   Page 6…

MBDR Video 1 Available NOW!

DVD—

35 Rhythms!

2½ Hours!